Fortunare Nos was composed in 1986 for the wedding of one of Tranchell's students. It incorporates the hymn tune Wish Road originally written for Eastbourne College in 1950. The words are from a hymn by Henry J. Buckoll (1803-71) in Psalms and Hymns for Rugby School Chapel, 1850, and the Latin verse is a translation, presumably by Tranchell, of Verse 1.

Two (and possibly three) versions of this triple chant are found in the Cambridge University Library archive: 

Peter Tranchell's Sonatina for pianoforte (1949) is a little mysterious - Tranchell didn't mention it in letters home, and was at the time talking more about his piano concerto (which either never materialised or has been lost). The work is in five movements, duration approx. 15 minutes.

"Heaven!", for voice and piano, was written in 1954 for performance in "Just as it Comes" at Trinity College, Cambridge. The lyrics are by Simon Phipps (Chaplain at Trinity College 1953-57 and Bishop of Lincoln between 1974 and 1987).

Peter Tranchell wrote this setting of Psalm 23 (The Lord is my shepherd) in 1962 for unison voices and organ, revised it in 1970 for two-part male-voices and organ, and again in 1976 for ATBrB choir and organ. The score published here has been arranged for SATB by Peter Marchbank.

In 1954 Peter wrote the music for the musical comedy Zuleika, which culminated in a three month run in the West End in 1957. We have published a typeset version of Peter Tranchell's own piano edition.

When PAT eventually bought a television he became obsessed with the Australian TV soap Neighbours (among other things!). He arranged the well-known theme tune (by Tony Hatch) as an Anglican chant - it was heard at least once in Caius chapel services, receiving the reaction ‘that seems faintly familiar...’ although the harmonisation is pure Tranchell. The composer's name is an anagram of "Neighbours", and the arranger "I'm astraan" i.e. Australian. The chant was probably written around 1987.

These settings were composed by Peter Tranchell, Precentor (Director of Music) at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, for use by the chapel choir in the regular round of evening services. Although written three years apart and for a slightly different disposition of voices, Tranchell clearly saw them as a ‘set’ since they were recorded together in 1981 for private release on the LP recording ‘Music from Caius’ in 1985.

Peter Tranchell composed this 1958 Sonata for Organ (his second) for, and partly based on the name of, Peter Le Huray, a fellow lecturer in the Music Faculty of Cambridge University, and Director of Music at St Catharine’s College.

The Carol Voluntary is a light-hearted piece with a serious side, melding eight different carols (at the last count) with unexpected results. It was first written for Tranchell's friend David Isitt (later The Reverend) in 1948, then revised in 1964.

The full anthem Cantantibus organis for St Cecilia’s Day was written by Peter Tranchell in 1987 for use by the choir of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he was Precentor (Director of Music), and it was sung at Evensong (presumably on St Cecilia’s Day, 22 November) that year. It was written for S.A.T.T.B. and Organ.

People, look East was composed in 1982 for the Gonville and Caius Choir and originally scored for AATBrBB (though with a note on the cover saying 'If necessary, the first alto part may be sung by sopranos'). The version performed by St. John's College Choir in the 2015 Advent Carol Service was arranged for SATB by Peter Marchbank in 2013.

Peter Tranchell set this famous text (from Edward Fitzgerald’s version of Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám of Naishápúr) to music in May 1978, shortly before the death of Geoffrey Thornton, the Caius Chapel organ scholar who succumbed to melanoma. Peter knew it was inevitable and although there's nothing on the score it was conceived very much as an In Memoriam.